Age differences in cardiac autonomic regulation during intermittent exercise in the heat

FAME Lab - Age differences in cardiac autonomic regulation during intermittent exercise in the heatKaltsatou A, Flouris AD, Herry CL, Notley SR, Seely AJE, Beatty HW, Kenny GP. Age differences in cardiac autonomic regulation during intermittent exercise in the heat. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2020 Feb;120(2):453-465. doi: 10.1007/s00421-019-04290-8. Epub 2020 Jan 1. PMID: 31894413.

Abstract:

Purpose: This study aimed to detect potential differences in heart-rate variability (HRV) during a moderate-intensity intermittent exercise in the heat among physically active young (25.8 ± 1.9 years), middle-aged (43.5 ± 2.8 years), and older (62.9 ± 3.7 years) men. Methods: Thirty-three participants (11/group) performed four successive bouts of 15-min cycling at a moderate fixed rate of metabolic heat production of ~ 400 W; each separated by a 15-min recovery with 1 h of final recovery in a hot and dry environment (35 °C, 20% relative humidity). Twelve HRV indices were computed that have been commonly described in the literature, and characterized various domains of the variability and complexity of heart rate. Results: Cardiac autonomic regulation during intermittent exercise in the heat, as well as during pre-exercise rest and recovery was significantly affected by age, as changes were observed among the three different aged groups in five indices (p ≤ 0.05). Similarly, time influenced cardiac autonomic regulation as three indices showed changes across time (p ≤ 0.05) during intermittent exercise, whilst five indices displayed significant changes (p ≤ 0.05) during rest and recovery in the heat. Conclusions: This study supports that moderate-intensity intermittent exercise in the heat is associated with significant cardiac autonomic dysregulation in older men, as compared to young and middle-aged men, yet it highlights the importance of developing preventative health strategies for heat-related illness in aged individuals.

Full Text Link:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31894413/